Saturday, February 17, 2018

More On Florida School Shooting

The FBI was warned last month that Nikolas Cruz was an armed psycho who might shoot up a school — but it didn’t bother investigating, the agency admitted Friday.
Pressure on Bureau Mounts... 
The revelation that the FBI botched a potentially life-saving tip on the Florida school shooting suspect is a devastating blow to America's top law enforcement agency at a time when it is already under extraordinary political pressure.
Even before the startling disclosure that the FBI failed to investigate a warning that the suspect, Nikolas Cruz, could be plotting an attack, the bureau was facing unprecedented criticism from President Trump and other Republicans, who have accused it of partisan bias.
 Before Nikolas Cruz carried out his mass killing at a Florida high school this week, police responded to his home 39 times over a seven-year period, according to disturbing new documents.
Details about the calls to the Broward County Sheriff’s Office — obtained from police records by CNN — were not immediately available and it was impossible to determine if all involved Cruz.
Nikolas Cruz cut his arms on Snapchat and said he wanted to buy a gun in September 2016, more than a year before he was accused of killing 17 people in a school in Parkland, Florida, records obtained by the South Florida Sun Sentinel show.
The incident on the digital social network prompted an investigation by sheriff’s deputies and adult welfare investigators from the Department of Children & Family Services.
Nikolas Cruz was reportedly one of the members in a private group chat on Instagram where they exchanged racist and violent messages 
Cruz joined the chat, called 'Murica great', around August 2017 
In some of the messages, the 19-year-old suspected shooter talked about his hatred for African Americans, Jews and gay people
Cruz reportedly threatened to kill people in one message and used his paycheck to buy body armor 
Other messages included Cruz talking about killing birds with his gun and sending a letter to President Donald Trump and getting a response
The teen is accused of killing 17 people at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida on Wednesday, February 14 
He was arraigned on 17 counts of premeditated murder - charges that carry the possibility of the death penalty
Fire alarm put students, staff in gunman's way... 
How killer’s path through a school left 17 dead in six short minutes of terror
Anger bubbles over at funerals...
An early morning fog rises where 17 memorial crosses were placed, for the 17 deceased students and faculty from the Wednesday shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, Fla., Saturday, Feb. 17, 2018. As families began burying their dead, authorities questioned whether they could have prevented the attack at the high school where a gunman, Nikolas Cruz, took several lives.
PARKLAND, Fla. (AP) -- Thousands of angry students, parents, teachers and neighbors of a Florida high school where 17 people were killed demanded Saturday that immediate action be taken on gun-control legislation, insisting they would not relent until their demands were met.
The rallies in Fort Lauderdale and St. Petersburg gave a political outlet to the growing feelings of rage and mourning sparked by the carnage. Authorities say a former student who had been expelled, had mental health issues and been reported to law enforcement, used a legally purchased semiautomatic rifle to kill students and staff at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland.

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