Monday, January 8, 2018


Birthright citizenship:
The Immigration and Nationality Act defines Birthright Citizenship in the United States, but there is also a clause in the 14th Amendment of the U.S. Constitution. While the Supreme Court has interpreted the latter Birthright Citizenship clause as it applies to legal immigrants, it has never done so with regard to illegal aliens.
The United States and Canada are the only developed nations that grant automatic citizenship so expansively to children born within their borders. Anyone born in the United States is considered an American citizen regardless of whether the parents are U.S. citizens, legal residents, temporary visitors, or illegal aliens in the U.S. (Here is a more detailed country-by-country list of the status of national laws regarding birthright citizenship.) Automatic citizenship is granted according to federal statute, not the 14th Amendment, so critics of the policy argue that this could be reformed by changing or repealing the statute outright.
Birth Tourism:
Birth tourism is travel to another country for the purpose of giving birth in that country. "Anchor baby" is another related term which can have negative connotations. The main reason for birth tourism is to obtain citizenship for the child in a country with birthright citizenship (jus soli). Other reasons include access to public schooling, healthcare, sponsorship for the parents in the future,[1] or even circumvention of China's two-child policy. Popular destinations include the United States and Canada. Another target for birth tourism is Hong Kong, where mainland Chinese citizens travel to give birth to gain right of abode for their children.
Chain Migration
Chain Migration starts with a foreign citizen chosen by our government to be admitted on the basis of what he/she is supposed to offer in our national interest. The Original Immigrant is allowed to bring in his/her nuclear family consisting of a spouse and minor children. After that, the chain begins. Once the Original Immigrant and his/her spouse becomes a U.S. citizen, they can petition for their parents, adult sons/daughters and their spouses and children, and their adult siblings.
The Family-Chain categories are divided into four separate preferences:
  1st Preference: Unmarried sons/daughters of U.S. citizens and their children (capped at 23,400/year)
  2nd Preference: Spouses, children, and unmarried sons/daughters of green card holders (capped at 114,000/year)
  3rd Preference: Married sons/daughters of U.S. citizens and their spouses and children (capped at 23,400/year)
  4th Preference: Brothers/sisters of U.S. citizens (at least 21 years of age) and their spouses and children (capped at (65,000/year)
The Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) was an American immigration policy that allowed some individuals who entered the country as minors, and had either entered or remained in the country illegally, to receive a renewable two-year period of deferred action from deportation and to be eligible for a work permit. As of 2017, approximately 800,000 individuals—referred to as Dreamers after the DREAM Act bill—were enrolled in the program created by DACA. The policy was established by the Obama administration in June 2012 and rescinded by the Trump administration in September 2017.[1]
Visa Lottery
The Diversity Immigrant Visa program, also known as the green card lottery, is a United States congressional lottery program for receiving a United States Permanent Resident Card. The Immigration Act of 1990 established the current and permanent Diversity Visa (DV) program.
The lottery is administered by the Department of State and conducted under the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA). It makes available 50,000 immigrant visas annually and aims to diversify the immigrant population in the United States, by selecting applicants from countries with low rates of immigration in the previous five years. As of 2017, around 20 million people apply for the lottery each year. Each year, the Department of State publishes new instructions for applicants.
Numerous fraudulent schemes purport to increase the likelihood of winning in the lottery, but in fact the only way to apply and win is to enter one's data into the State Department's website, free of charge.
Attempts have been made to end the program since 2005. In 2017, it received widespread attention after eight people were killed in a terrorist attack by a recipient of a diversity immigrant visa.
Illegal Entry Into USA
Illegal immigration to the United States is the entry into the United States of foreign nationals without government permission, and in violation of United States immigration laws. Foreign nationals are also illegal immigrants if they continue to be in the country after their visa, or other authority to enter or be in the country, has expired. The United States had nearly open borders until 1924, which meant that all immigrants to the United States up to that point were legal.[1][2][3][4] The Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882 and a few other modest border regulations were enacted in the 1870s and 1880s.[5] The Immigration Act of 1924 established visa requirements and enacted quotas for immigrants from specific countries.[2]
Estimates in 2015 put the number of unauthorized immigrants at 11 million, representing 3.4% of the total U.S. population.[6] The population of unauthorized immigrants peaked in 2007, when it was at 12.2 million and 4% of the total U.S. population.[6][7] Illegal border crossings are at the lowest levels they have been in decades.[8][9][10] In 2014, unauthorized immigrant adults have lived in the U.S. for a median of 13.6 years, with approximately two-thirds having lived in the U.S. for at least a decade.[6] In 2012, 52% were from Mexico, 15% from Central America, 12% from Asia, 6% from South America, 5% from the Caribbean, and another 5% from Europeand Canada.[11]
Overstaying VISA
US Department of Homeland Security is scrutinizing a lesser known type of undocumented immigrant: the one who comes in legally. In a new report released May 22, the agency has attempted to count the people who overstayed their visas in fiscal year 2016. The results tell a different story than the border apprehension numbers, and suggest that the US should broaden its singular focus on the border to include airports and seaports as well.
By the end of fiscal year 2016, some 630,000 visitors had failed to leave the US, far exceeding the 415,000 people who were intercepted crossing the US-Mexico boundary during the same time period. According to Homeland Security, Canadians, not northbound Latin Americans, were the biggest group of violators. About 120,000 Canadians with expired visas were still believed to be living in the US at the end of the period covered by the report, versus roughly 47,000 Mexicans.

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