Monday, February 1, 2016

Iowa Caucus Not a Primary -Fact Not Even an Election

The Iowa caucuses are not a primary. In fact they’re not even an election.
Image result for iowa caucus 2016
The caucuses, which kick off the presidential nominating calendar, are official party meetings across the state’s nearly 1,700 precincts. In high school gymnasiums, suburban libraries, and living rooms, Iowa voters express their candidate preference among their peers. Sometimes they’ll submit their choices on pieces of paper. In other instances, they’ll walk to corners of a room that represent their candidate.
The parties calculate their caucus winners in two different ways. It’s simple for Republicans: They just tally supporters for each candidate across the state. 
Democrats require a threshold — usually 15 percent — of support for a candidate in each caucus. If a candidate doesn’t reach 15 percent, their supporters are asked to pick another candidate, and the If a candidate doesn’t reach 15 percent, their supporters are asked to pick another candidate, and the group will caucus again.

In both parties, the candidates with the most support get more delegates on caucus night. But for Democrats, the final tally is determined through a series of county and regional conventions in the months that follow caucus night. 99 counties, 1,681 precincts

No comments:

Post a Comment

Comments are moderated, and will appear after approval..Anonymous comments will not be approved.